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Dehydrating Frozen Fruit

fruit salad jar

Warmer weather is coming my way, so it’s time to make sure I have plenty of room in my freezer. I still have peaches, strawberries, nectarines, and blueberries from this summer, and need to make some jam and cobbler for the freezer. I just ran out of all my dehydrated fruits except apples, so I decided to try dehydrating frozen fruit. It worked, and in fact, it’s quicker to dehydrate frozen verses fresh fruit, especially blueberries.

 

frozen fruit

I love home dehydrated fruits because they don’t have a sickening sweet sugar coating. Also, store bought dehydrated fruit is extremely expensive. Of course, I give dehydrated fruit to my family for snacks and use them in trial mix, but I also use them in homemade oatmeal, homemade granola bars, and even in iced tea. I throw the dehydrated fruit in with the cold water and tea bags, and strain the fruit out with the tea bags. Our favorite so far is strawberry, and next I’ll try pineapple.

Along with cleaning out my freezer, I’m also emptying jars left and right. We finished up the honey-spiced peaches, chunked pineapple, pasta sauce, peach jam, apple sauce, corn, and many other canned items. Although canned food is shelf stable for years, it’s best to rotate your stock on a yearly basis to ensure the best quality. I got a pressure canner last year for my birthday, and started really experimenting with it last spring. We moved this summer, so I lost the time to keep up. Our new house has a flat cooktop, and you cannot pressure can on a flat cook top. We will be swapping out the stove very soon, because I never know when I will get a great produce deal.

So as my freezer gets more barren, and my collection of empty jars piles up, I’ll be dreaming of new canning recipe experiments and re-stocking my supply.

 

 

 

{ 3 comments… add one }
  • Cheryl December 31, 2016, 2:56 AM

    I am thrilled to know you can dehydrate frozen fruit!!!! I am very new to this. But the article doesn’t have a step by step process only links to other recipes..

    Pls Pls send step by step instructions for dehydration get blueberries cherries and whole strawberries.

    Thanks and HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

    • Laura Macklem December 31, 2016, 3:08 AM

      Hi Cheryl! After defrosted, the fruit should be pretty limp and fine for just laying on the trays, but if it’s really thick you should cut it while still frozen into thinner pieces. Just lay it on trays and dehydrate the fruit until just pliable. Always allow your fruit to cool before determining if it’s done or not, unless it’s obvious there is still too much moisture.

      Regarding blueberries – – I’ve seen videos of people poking holes in each blueberry, which is a lot of work! I’ve tried pulsing in the processor the blueberries and dehydrating them, but I’ve not had good results, although I have had great results with cranberries in this way. For cherries, slice in half, and strawberries just slice, but not too thin.

      I would be delighted to answer any other questions you have about dehydrating. I’ve had both triumphs and disappointments, and I’m happy to share my experience. Just post on Preserved Home’s Facebook page if you have any other questions not related to this post. Thank you, and Happy New Year to you as well!

  • Pat May 28, 2017, 10:41 PM

    What temp and about how long to dehydrate? What should they feel like. Plyable or crispy?

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