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It’s been a week of chicken catastrophe. First, after I bought a 40 pound box of chicken leg quarters because they were only 35 cents a pound, and if you wanted the deal you must take the whole box. I was thinking the leg quarters were individually frozen, so after bringing them home, I stuck the box in my freezer. When I took out the box, to my horror they were all stuck together. The past several days have involved me processing 40 pounds of chicken. I made for the freezer: pot pie filling, chicken tortilla soup, white chicken chili and grilled chicken. I canned seven quarts of chicken stock, and seven quarts of chicken vegetable soup. I’ve made chicken curry sandwiches for lunches. I also made chicken and dumplings, twice, hence part two of my chicken catastrophe.

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chickenstock.1

I was at our Classical Conversations homeschool group, from 8:40-3:30, including travel time. My family likes to eat at 5 p.m., so I needed a solution. Before I left for our group, from the freezer I took homemade, frozen stuffed red bell peppers. When I got home, I threw the peppers in the oven, made a quick salad. Then I got in the mood to be industrious, so I decided to make stock, since it only takes 30 minutes to cook. Yes, 30 minutes using raw, frozen chicken, and vegetables.

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Stacked Chicken Freezer MealsAldi has boneless, skinless chicken breasts this week for $1.49 a pound. Yippeee!!! That is the lowest I have ever paid. You must stock up at this price. But instead of just freezing them just plain, freeze some in marinade. Also, freeze some pre-cooked and shredded for a quick dinner. You can also grill some of the chicken and freeze.

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Boil in a Bag Slow Roasted Chicken

Not to brag, but I feel like this is rather brilliant. Boil-in-the-bag slow roasted chicken? Oh yes, it works, and the chicken tastes just as good as it did coming fresh out of the oven.

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Chive Flowers

Chives are best known as a topping for baked potatoes, but this mild member of the onion family can be used in a variety of ways. Chives are wonderful in salads, sauces, and marinades. And did you know the purple flowers of chives are edible? Just pick them, wash, and let thoroughly dry several days on a cookie sheet. Keep them in a sealed jar until ready to use. My favorite way to use chive flowers is in this Tarragon-Chive Flower Chicken recipe. The purple flecks of these flowers pretty up this wine-cream sauce. This is a recipe written by a woman named Lee Morgan, who was on a recipe board I frequented some years ago.

Serve with a side of pasta or roasted potatoes, and a crisp salad or roasted asparagus.
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